Woolly Wonder
One of the suggested historical Dublin walks from my master book sent me up O’Connell Street today past the General Post Office (where the Revolution started) and the Millennium Spire, towards the Dublin Writer’s Museum. There was a brief stop in Beshoff‘s, an Edwardian fish ‘n chips shop that turned out to be a nice place to chill out and people watch at 2:30 on a weekday afternoon. I set my expectations a little high for the museum after yesterday’s trek to Dun Laoghaire but there were similarly worthwhile anecdotes across a broader set of authors.
Post office: where the revolution beganDublin Writer's Museum

On my way back to get ready to meet Sasha for dinner, I made what was supposed to be a brief stop at one of the coolest ideas for an exhibit ever: A Woolly Wonder: Hyperbolic Coral Reef at The Naughton Institute slash Science Gallery, a part of Trinity College Dublin. They had a few reefs represented, an area to participate by crocheting (interactivity!), and even a Maths exhibit to demonstrate the geometric models of crochet and the ocean. You can read more about the hyperbolic coral reef exhibit here. And there is even a TED Talk about the project.

I spent far more time there than I planned. Here are photos I took:

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Dinner was at L’Gueuleton, yet another fantastic recommendation from Sasha, but this time WITH Sasha. I had the goat cheese tomato tart, Mr. T had the Toulouse Sausage and potatoes. AMAZING food & cozy atmosphere in a busy part of town. Recommended. I wish we had this place in Seattle.

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One Response to Dublin Writers & The Science Gallery’s Hyperbolic Coral Reef

  1. […] civilized watering hole, where our ancient ears could recover and we could catch up on life since our last dinner together.   If you enjoyed this article, please consider sharing […]

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